7.08.2012

Meg and Joe's Tiny House



We've been living in our tiny house for almost a year! Here's the latest and probably last video on our experience. Enjoy!

13 comments:

  1. Hello Meg n Joe, My friend and I have been building a tiny house for the past few months. We I found your vids on youtube when searching for ideas on plans because I didn't like the cramped lofts in the tumbleweeds. I saw a few with the raised dormer style and we ended up drawing up plans that are almost exactly like your house. We have a blog on wordpress if you'd care to see pics. I have a problem with moving the house - it's not completed yet so I'm sure the weight isn't as much as yours at this point. We were just wondering the size of your truck, because even though our ford ranger says it would pull 5800 lbs...the tongue weight just pulls the truck down to the ground. We've looked around and found that most people seem to use a 3/4 ton pickup, but was wondering if your truck was 1 1/2 ton (like a ford 150) or if we need a ford 250 (3/4 ton) to haul it. If you look at the pics on our blog you'll see that it's the same shape as your house and out trailer is rated for 10 tons. Any info on your experiences pulling your house will be most appreciated.

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  2. Hi! We love your house, it's quite beautiful. To answer your question a we pull it with a 1 ton truck, but a 3/4 ton will do if you don't plan on pulling it up mountain roads. When all is said and done our house comes in at 10,00lbs fully loaded. Take into consideration where you want to pull it. A short distance a 3/4 should do the job, for any real distance I would go at least one ton or higher just to be safe.
    The only advice I can give for moving it is to make sure your roof that faces the wind is completely secured. The overhang will tear off if not secured to the side of your house. I learned this from experience. We have never pulled it above 55mph just out of fear. Good luck to you, free time rocks!

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  4. Hi Meg and Joe. First, I just wanted to say that I really like the design of your house. I've returned to your videos many times through the design and now buidling progress of my house (http://facebook.com/buildingthetinyhouse).

    That aside, I do have a question. I am located and plan to live in Norther VT, which is a cold climate comparable to Montana where you are. I noticed a picture of your house in the winter- what was that material that you used to wrap the open section of the trailer? Also- how do you handle getting water in and out of the house during the freezing months? I figured I would go with insulating heat tape, but wanted to see if you had come up with a better solution. Thanks!

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    1. Sorry it's taken me so long to reply. You posted this almost the same time I had my stroke, so I have been out of commission for awhile.
      As far as insulation goes we have polystyrene in the walls and floor. We opted for this for several reasons. It handles moisture very well, it does not rot if it gets wet, its super easy to work with and best of all it works great. I have spent below zero temps in this house and it keeps nice and warm. Hope this helps, and thanks for being patient.

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  5. How is your first winter in Montana in your tiny house? Is the Dickinson boat heater sufficient?

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  6. More than enough to keep us nice and warm. It can get really hot in here.

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  7. Good to hear the Dickinson is enough... I've wondered about that in terms of living in Canada. What R-value do you think you have in the walls, floor, roof? And I too am interested in Ethan's question about water -- how to get it in and out of house in the winter? heat tape? Anything else to insulate water pipes for winter months?

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    1. Have the standard polystyrene in my walls. Not sure of the R-value. All I can say to 40F you must turn off the heat. Above 50F you want to open a window or two. I run water year round. Standard RV hose, heat tape running down the hose and covered with standard pipe insulation. Never froze once, even at 40 below. Even I was shocked. Redneck solution ftw.

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  8. I love your project! My name is Whitney, I am completing a Certificate at Yestermorrow Design Build school in Warren, VT. For my project I am researching the availability of homeowners insurance for tiny homes. If you own a tiny home please take a few moments to fill out this survey. Thank you for your time! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DXXW3X3

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  9. Hi, I just stumbled onto your blog and love your little house! We're actually in the Flathead valley as well and had a few questions. Did you have to pull any permits for building and when looking for property did you have to worry about zoning? Also, are you connected to utilities (power, water, sewage)? If so did you have any trouble getting connected due to the size/mobility of the house? We're thinking pretty seriously about building one in the area soon too but are hesitant due to the above concerns.
    Thanks!

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    1. No permits needed if its on wheels. Falls under RV rules and regulations, Go crazy. In this state you can put them anywhere you want. I am hooked to water and electricity, I'd love to go solar, but this is the valley after all. No sewer, we compost. It's really not that hard. As far as the hook ups, Standard extension cord and standard hose. After 2 years, still the best decision we have ever made. Go for it!

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  10. where do you find places to park/hook into water and electric? I'd love to go tiny - and I'm looking to move to missoula next year from Virginia - but I need to get things in place before I make the jump.

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